Berkshire Country Garden

This project was for a private client, who was knocking down a modest existing house on the Wentworth estate and completely rebuilding it. The intention was to create a garden that reflected the elegance and sophistication of Palladian Style Architecture of the new house. We took references from classical Renaissance gardens but added a contemporary twist with strong underlying geometry.

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The use of false perspective was often employed in Renaissance gardens to trick the eye into believing the garden was even bigger. Statuary, gazebos, terracing, areas of shade, hidden seating and especially water and fountains were all part of this movement. We have tried to incorporate all these elements into the garden using false perspective for the central avenue of trees, leading to the focal urn in the centre.

We created different Plateaus to accommodate the topography of the site, making the design practical as well as dramatic taking into consideration views from the house and access points. We felt that it was very important to have a dramatic transition from the house and patio to the garden, so we widened and opened the steps up, embracing the upper levels.

The Pagoda stands at the highest point on the garden, emphasized by the sculpted landforms that wrap around its base. It is surrounded by a water moat, which has jets of water providing a dramatic vertical impact. This water is then linked via a cascading rill in between the steps down to the lower terrace. At this point on the lower terrace, is a small formal garden, with circular sawn York stone setts around the small water feature with 2 benches and wide stone steps that lead down to the main garden terrace.

The water feature is then picked up on the opposite side of the garden, in the centre of an ornamental par-terre, with a long wide rill that pours via 3 spouts down to the lower terrace, thereby linking all 3 water features together and unifying the whole garden. The water of course is also there to detract from the noise of the A30.

The high curved wall here, hides a ramped path that provides a second, secret access point to the garden, leading you up behind the water feature, into the more woodland part of the garden, behind the curved clipped yew, and right up to the Pagoda via stone steps and providing a vista over the whole garden.

Registered member of the society of garden designers

British Association of Landscape Industries

Royal Horticultural Society 0 London Garden Designer